INNOVATION OVERLOAD


Introduction

First published: August 2006 | We never tire of pointing out that emerging consumer trends are only good for one thing: helping you get inspired to innovate, to come up with new goods, services and experiences for (or even better, together with) your customers.

So the question we're most often asked is: how do I apply a trend and turn it into something profitable? The answer is surprisingly simple: start by taking a look at innovative companies around the world that are already capitalising on trends, and learn from them. And where better to go for inspiring examples than our sister site Springwise?




In fact, if you’re a regular Springwise reader, you already know that we live in a world of absolute INNOVATION OVERLOAD: clever entrepreneurs, inventors, and marketers from all over are coming up with so many innovative ideas, that even innovation blogs have a hard time keeping track. Which implies that:

1. Innovation isn't rocket science. It's an obsession with understanding or creating what makes consumers happy, what delights them, which problems they face, and then creating something that delivers to those needs.
2. Innovation is not necessarily about serious people in white coats puttering about in R&D labs. In an experience economy (which we’re still in, like it or not), marketing innovations rule.
3. Wherever you live, you have absolutely NO excuse to be unaware of innovations popping up in Austria, in The Netherlands, in Japan, in Brazil, in the US, in Turkey, in South Africa, as it’s all out there: check out our Trend Unit Briefing for a full list of sources.

So let’s look at a small selection of business ideas that have recently been highlighted by Springwise and its network of spotters. Some of them cute, some of them possibly The Next Big Thing, but all of them capitalising on current consumer trends. We're focusing on just three of them: UPGRADE EVERYTHING, DAILY LUBRICANTS, and ONLINE OXYGEN, plus a couple of FOREVER trends. The concepts are ready to be copied, improved, franchised, or used as a starting point to do something even more profitable. Preferably by you!

Note: Please feel free to add your thoughts. Each idea links to a full description and comments section on Springwise.


From Canada to China, hundreds of millions of consumers are becoming more prosperous every year. And the really prosperous ones already have everything they really need. No wonder, then, that a trend like MASSCLUSIVITY (exclusivity and luxury for the masses) shows no signs of slowing down. So what's next? How about UPGRADE EVERYTHING?

Following in the footsteps of the usual suspects (luxurious cars, longer and more exotic holidays, USD 50 starters at uber trendy restaurants), even the most mundane products and services are now being upgraded, to provide consumers with comfort, status and beauty, or at least the illusion thereof, and to provide the brands that produce them with fat margins.

Check out:

Sexy supermarkets in the Alps | What could be more mundane than supermarkets? In the world of upgrading everything: many products and services are, actually! After WholeFoods re-defined an entire industry in the US, now MPreis, a chain of supermarkets in western Austria, is taking the trend one step further. Billing itself as "The Seriously Sexy Supermarket", the company's stores literally stand out because of their unusual and progressive architecture.

MPreis has been commissioning up and coming architects for the last fifteen years, encouraging them to design buildings that make the most of their settings in the Tyrolean Alps. Which is in stark contrast to most chain retailers, who find a building formula and repeat it, regardless of location.

A keen eye for aesthetics continues inside the stores, which feature sleek café's and carefully chosen materials. And the experience goes beyond design – MPreis also understands the value of storytelling, emphasizing that the company is family-owned, and was founded by an entrepreneurial woman (Frau Therese Mölk) in the 1920s.
Surprisingly, price levels at MPreis aren't higher than at competing supermarkets in the region. Although award-winning design comes at a slightly higher cost than generic structures, the buildings look more expensive than they are. Plenty of opportunities for big-box retailers across the world to become patrons of good architecture and bold design, while upgrading the shopping for toilet paper, pickles and detergents experience!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/retail/sexy_supermarkets_in_the_alps
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.


Office supplies | First office buildings were redesigned, then office furniture, and now… office supplies. Offering an alternative to boring office supplies, russell+hazel sell stylish binders, paper, storage and accessories. With home offices proliferating, the market for beautiful and functional office gear is growing at a healthy pace. A simple upgrading opportunity, not in the least for MINIPRENEURS.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/style_design/office_supplies_upgraded
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.





Luxury fabric care | Last year, Springwise wrote about Laundry Spa and Slate, two laundry services with a deluxe touch (more well-off consumers means more expensive clothes, which means a new market for deluxe care).

Now, The Laundress, a line of premium fabric care products provides detergents for superior fabrics, from wool/cashmere shampoo to baby detergent, is extending the luxury laundry concept to consumers all over the United States. A no-brainer really; we wouldn’t be surprised to see Unilever or Procter & Gamble do a little R&D by M&A in this sector soon. Quickly introduce your own premium, upgraded detergent brand so you too can sell to them? ;-)

Full article here: www.springwise.com/life_hacks/luxury_fabric_care
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.



Saucy chic | Leave it to the French to combine l'amour and le style. Worlds away from tawdry shops frequented by men in overcoats, Kiki de Montparnasse has turned the sex shop into an erotic boutique.

Described as 'Madame de Pompadour meets Monica Vitti', Kiki is luxuriously furnished and dimly lit. Glass cases hold handmade whips and 'restraining arts' kits in crocodile leather with gold hardware; elegant Kiki-branded toys include a vibe bejewelled with Swarovski crystals, which also adorn tasselled pasties.

Kiki de Montparnasse isn't the first company to provide a luxurious take on sensual products. London's Coco de Mer, sells a host of decadent toys and undergarments, as does Kink in South Africa, Swedish Lelo crafts sculptural toys from luxurious materials, and San Francisco-based Jimmyjane sells a Little Something (an 'elegant and seductive accessory') that comes in gold and platinum and be personalized with etched words of love. Everything can be upgraded, indeed ;-)

For those entrepreneurs who can create the right combination of playful, provocative, seductive and chic, this is a high-margin market ripe for the picking.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/lifestyle_leisure/saucy_chic
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.





Funky kiwi campers | A camper is a camper is a camper? Not Down Under, where Escape Rentals, a New Zealand camper rental company, sets itself apart by letting artists turn camper vans into art on wheels. (As pointed out by a Springwise reader, Australian Wicked Campers does the same.)

Each of Escape's nearly 100 campers is given an aerosol overhaul by a New Zealand artist. Paint jobs draw from the whole spectrum of visual art and pop culture, from kiwiana to Far Side comics and Maurice Sendak to Pablo Picasso. Rental rates are competitive, at around NZD 59 (USD 37/EUR 29) per day, with optional extras like mobile phones and solar showers charged separately. The company is -- surprise, surprise -- attracting travellers who are tired of mass tourism and looking for a more unique experience. What’s your industry’s Escape Rentals?

Full article here: www.springwise.com/tourism_travel/funky_kiwi_campers
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.



No-frills chic takes flight in Japan | The airline industry has become one of the most interesting arenas to study violent creative destruction: witness low fare airlines, who, by offering cheap, no-frills flights, single-handedly killed off a number of under-performing, over-charging airlines, and who are now experiencing the 'joys' of ongoing innovation themselves. What gives? Suddenly, their services look and feel crappy next to new, equally inexpensive airlines who've added design and comfort.

Best new example of this UPGRADE EVERYTHING in the skies: Japanese StarFlyer. "Blazing through the world like a comet," StarFlyer's homebase is the new airport of Kitakyushu. Sleek, black & white, and sexy, the airline's look was designed by Flower Robotics, a Japanese design firm that specializes in robotics and architecture. Instead of fitting in the maximum of 170 passengers in their Airbus A320 aircraft, StarFlyer stopped at 144 seats, creating extra legroom and comfort. Each roomy, all-leather seat also has its own LCD monitor for in-flight television, and a laptop power port.

If you don't have a few billion yen starting capital lying around, no worries. Our point is that the combination of low cost and high style can be applied to everything. Whether it's the Ginger hotel chain in India, or Viktor & Rolf designing for H&M. For a wide range of examples, check out NO FRILLS CHIC. Oh, and if you do happen to have, say, 130 million dollars to spare (JetBlue's start-up capital in 2000, yet another no frills chic contender), please note that Europe is impatiently waiting to board its own cheap-chic jets. Soon, Ryanair and easyJet won't cut it anymore ;-)

Full article here: www.springwise.com/transportation/nofrills_chic_takes_flight_in
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.





Haute design cineplex
| Located in the south-east '13ème' district of Paris, MK2 Bibliothèque features 14 screens, as well as cafes, restaurants, DVD shop, classical music boutique, bookstore, modern art gallery and even a DJ bar. Besides state of the art projection and sound, the theatres' trademark feature is MK2 Bibliothèque's 'fauteuils pour deux': loveseats for two. As for what's up on the screen, there's a strong focus on independent and arthouse movies, as well as blockbusters.

Upgrading the cinema -- a business still accustomed to offering standard, average comfort to the masses -- works for MK2. While overall French admission fell more than 10 percent in 2005, MK2 lifted revenues by 4.4 percent while net profits increased by more than 14 percent to EUR 12 million (source: Financial Times). C'est pas mal!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/entertainment/haute_design_cineplex
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.





The convenience trend, which is all about making harried lives easier, is not only going to be with us for a long time to come, it's also one of those trends that make it easy to come up with new business concept and ideas. After all, what can NOT be made easier? Don't forget, to consumers, time is the new currency.

Check out the following DAILY LUBRICANTS:

Being space for mobile warriors | These days, every business professional is a mobile warrior, working and connecting from anywhere, anytime, surviving on a heavy dose of caffeine. So why are self-proclaimed ‘work and being spaces’ like Starbucks stores so damn noisy, and do many ‘business lounges’ at airports force their most valuable customers to sit on the floor next to the restrooms, if they need to power their devices and/or serve them sub-standard coffee?

In another show of why turning trends into marketing innovation is not rocket-science, Canadian Coffee Office comes to the rescue. The Coffee Office is built for business – meeting spaces, workstations, conference rooms and café are combined into a centre for mobile professionals.

While the café section is open to everyone, and like the rest of the building, offers free high-speed wireless internet and plenty of power points, the rest of the space is reserved for TCO members, who have access to private workstations and conference rooms.
For CAD 90 per month, members have free use of the workstations, the members lounge, and (fuelling productivity) 25 complimentary coffees per month. When it's time for a power nap, a sleep module is available for CAD 10/hour. Other thoughtful touches include noise diffusers that help keep conversations private, and access to a Nerd On Site (which in itself is another business idea worth copying to every city in the world).

Plenty of opportunities for The Coffee Office, which is working on expansion through franchising, and other new entrants in this field. Does your city have one yet?

Full article here: www.springwise.com/lifestyle_leisure/being_space_for_mobile_warrior
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.




Letting customers skip the line | Money = access = time. And more so in New York than anywhere else. Which is why Mobo could be a winner: the Manhattan based service lets customers order from restaurants and pay for meals using sms, giving them priority access.

Customers create an account, which includes their credit card details. After signing up for the service, they can order online via www.gomobo.com, or by text message/sms. The order appears on the restaurant's in-store Mobo system, and is automatically billed to the customer's credit card. The restaurant confirms the order, and the customer receives a text message stating when the order will be ready for pick up.

Every Mobo restaurant has a separate Mobo Pick Up counter, so when their order is ready, Mobo users can walk straight to the counter, state their name and last four digits of their phone number, and pick up their food. For those customers that can't leave the office, Mobo also delivers. According to Mobo, the benefits for partnering restaurants are increased profits from new Mobo customers, higher average order amounts, increased customer loyalty and improved operating efficiency. The company is also developing platforms for other services that involve people standing in line, such as transportation and entertainment.

Customers save time, get a bit of that oh so coveted VIP treatment with their takeaways, and vendors increase profits. Now that mobile phones are truly ubiquitous, and ordering takeaways online is no longer a novelty, this DAILY LUBRICANT concept should work well anywhere!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/life_hacks/letting_customers_skip_the_lin
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.



Luxury convenience | Nothing gets the creative juices flowing like combining two leading trends. So, how about upgrading convenience stores? For inspiration on how to do it, check out Harrods 102 in London, a recently opened luxury convenience store across the street from its famous Food Halls.

Besides selling groceries and wine, Harrods 102 also houses a Yo! Sushi bar, a Krispy Kreme stand, florist, pharmacist, dry cleaning service, and oxygen bar. Adding to the convenience, Harrods 102 features a concierge service that will hand-deliver goods to local residents. According to Gulf Marketing Review Magazine, a Dubai-based Harrods 102 may already be in the works. Paris, New York and Berlin are also on the to-do list.

Meanwhile, in California, Famima (owned by FamilyMart, a Japanese franchise chain that operates 6,000 convenience stores in Japan, and 6,000 in Thailand, South Korea, Taiwan, Vancouver, and Shanghai) is bringing Japanese style to the convenience arena. Five recently opened stores in the Los Angeles area are the first of 250 planned Famima stores in the US. Catering to busy, affluent urbanites, the stores offer premium versions of regular convenience store goods. Drip coffee has been replaced by espresso, and microwaved hotdogs by fresh sushi and bento boxes. Famima sells a variety of premium groceries and prepared foods, alongside anime comics, European notepads and other stylish goodies.

As long as the design doesn't grow stale, and the food stays fresh, premium convenience stores like Famima and Harrods 102 will appeal to customers in cities across the globe. Sooner or later, a global chain will do for convenience what Starbucks did for coffee!

Full articles here: www.springwise.com/retail/luxury_convenience_store_updat (Harrods)
and www.springwise.com/retail/japanese_convenience (Famima)
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.



Charge lockers | Fact of life: consumers are completely addicted to their tech devices. Witness total panic, therefore, when dead batteries render the owners, well, powerless. In comes ChargeBox: a set of lockers designed to charge batteries of phones and other mobile devices. Created by British Boxbrands, ChargeBoxes have six lockers with each locker containing four different chargers. The user picks the appropriate locker for their device, opens the door and attaches the device to a charger inside. Payment is then made either with a GBP 1 coin or by sending an SMS to a specific code. Once payment has been received, the door can be locked and charging begins. BoxBrands has ambitions to have over 1000 in the UK by the end of 2006.

If you're a vending machine enthusiast, this should be right up your alley. And if you work for a mobile phone network, why not sponsor ChargeBoxes in high footfall locations? Good for your brand, and you'll benefit directly if consumers are able to spend more time on their phones. ;-)

Full article here: www.springwise.com/telecom_mobile/charge_lockers
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.




Quick delivery e-commerce is back | In the '90s, Kozmo offered speedy delivery of anything an urban dweller might want or need fast, without leaving their home or office. Pack of diapers or a bag of Cheetos - everything was delivered under an hour. No delivery fee, and no minimum order amount. Although they turned a profit in New York, Kozmo expanded to other cities too quickly, infamously burned through USD 280 million in venture capital, and went bust in 2001. Rival UrbanFetch.com awaited a similar fate.

But the concept obviously delighted time-starved consumers seeking DAILY LUBRICANTS, and with many a failed dotcom idea now finding a much more fertile market (1 billion people online), almost-instant delivery has made a come back.

Kozmo's former CTO went on to launch MaxDelivery in 2005, which Springwise featured earlier this year, along with Turkish After-9, bringing the concept to Istanbul. They’re now joined by San Francisco-based start-up-LicketyShip, who will deliver within two hours instead of one, charging around USD 20 for delivery. On the east coast, Zifty has been offering Atlantans fast delivery since 2004. Zifty delivers food, movies, magazines, snacks, and household goods in about an hour, and partners with restaurants to deliver meals.

Clearly, this is one of those concepts that every consumer LOVES, so if you learn from the companies above, while carefully watching your expenditures, there must be some money in this.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/retail/quick_delivery_ecommerce
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.


Indian fast food | Fast food saves time, and gives consumers a break from cooking and cleaning up. But there’s no natural law that dictates pizzas and burgers must dominate this USD 300+ billion market. With healthy fast food chains already on the rise (it’s that health trend again!), here’s the other opportunity to watch. With the average consumer being more adventurous, more travelled and more exposed to a global palette of flavours than ever, Japanese, Chinese, Latin American, and… Indian fast food chains are making waves.

For example, check out Tiffinbites, an Indian fast food chain in Britain, and Canadian Veda. Veda cooks with minimal amounts of oil, has a simple menu and uses high quality, healthy ingredients, with plenty of vegetarian options. Like Tiffinbites, Veda serves takeout food in stackable containers known as tiffins. For about USD 5, customers can order their choice of rice, two vegetable or meat curries and a naan. The chain plans to expand to other locations in Canada and the United States.

By offering inexpensive yet healthy Indian food in easy-to-carry containers, Veda and Tiffinbites have hit upon a combination that could become the next big flavour in fast food. Explore franchise opportunities, or start your own (well branded) tiffin-based restaurant!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/food_beverage/indian_fast_food_update
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.


 

Think the online revolution is entering a more consolidated phase? Neither do we. Consumers are deeply addicted to ONLINE OXYGEN, still spending more time online year in year out. They want to be online, they need to be online. There is no better space to innovate, to endlessly introduce new services, than this one. Case in point:


Yearbooks for Class of 2007 | Check out US-based Facebook, which enables 7.7 million members with a valid email address from a supported college, high school or company to create a profile and share information, photos, and interests with their friends. Even more closely focused is myyearbook.com, which specifically targets high school students. One million of them have already signed up, avidly adding their collections of videos, notes and photos in school-diary style.

Opportunities abound: in those countries where even the paper version of a yearbook isn't yet part of school culture, this is your chance to introduce a new tradition and do it web 2.0 style, with all the scaling advantages that the virtual has over the physical. Facebook has started a few international sites, but not comprehensively. Partner or take the lead. After all, this needs a local touch!

Furthermore, for any brand directly or indirectly targeting students (and what brand isn't!), this is where the eyeballs are. Whether Generation MySpace wants to interact with you is another matter. For some tips and examples on that, check out our previous Trend Briefing on YOUNIVERSAL BRANDING.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/media_publishing/yearbooks_for_class_of_2007
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.



Naughty youniverse | Targeting a different kind of meet up, Naughty America is launching this summer. It's an adult (18+) massively multiplayer online dating game, where players can create their own avatars and explore a 'sexy' world, or turn on their webcams for some real world 'action'. Real-world meet-ups can be arranged for as well. In other words: a more than mature version of the HabboHotels and Neopets of this world, where members can sexually explore like never before. Although Naughty America is inviting players from across the globe, there's a vibrant opportunity to set up Naughty Belgium, Naughty Singapore, Naughty Australia, etc.

Oh, and while we're at it: since veoh.com, a video sharing site, recently banned and deleted all 'adult' material, they've lost the only thing that made them truly stand out amongst a sea of competition. So, while 800 pound gorilla youtube.com is eating everybody's lunch in the non-adult content arena, recently launched pornotube.com is quickly filling this void and raking in the ad dollars. (Warning: absolutely not suitable for work or minors). Whether you like it or not, it's a very *innovative* world out there.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/gaming/naughty_youniverse
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.




Connecting off the courts | Surely MySpace now owns the world of social networking? Au contraire! With mass comes blandness, with mass often comes loss of focus, too. So it's no surprise that niche networks are blossoming: like Mesh Tennis, a new social networking site just for tennis players. Connecting the tennis community online, the website lets tennis players find other players of their own skill level, in their own area. It also lets players record scores and matches, review tennis gear, schedule events and read the latest tennis news.

Revenues? Besides (future) membership fees, niche social networks create prime online advertising space. One for Dunlop, Head or Wilson to sponsor? And if you're an avid tennis player outside the US, why not team up with Mesh's founder to bring the concept to the rest of the world? Oh, and if tennis is NOT your thing: another 101 or so sports could do with their own web 2.0-style networks. And the same goes for every hobby, topic or possession that gets people going. (Like... cars! Check out: MySpace for car lovers.)

Full article here: www.springwise.com/lifestyle_leisure/connecting_off_the_court
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.


There are emerging trends, and there are trends, that, are so well-documented, so extensively mapped, so researched to death, that the only thing left to do is to turn them into, you guessed it, innovative new stuff for your customers…


Consumer generated power Continuing concerns about climate change and skyrocketing energy prices are fuelling interest in alternative sources of energy. One of consumers’ major complaints though is the lack of making a real impact: separating bottles and papers only goes so far. Sensing a real opportunity, British/Scottish Windsave launched the Windsave 1000 system, a three-bladed fan (1.75 m in diameter) that connects to a building's standard mains supply. The turbine is quiet, with noise levels comparable to the sound of a person talking at normal volume. It produces approximately 1kw of electricity, enough to run a TV, DVD player, computer, fridge/freezer and several lights.

Windsave is now partnering with British Gas to market and install roof-top turbines; trials will be carried out in Scotland and South-West England later this year. Engineers from British Gas will supply and install all equipment for GBP 1,500, and it's projected that the turbines will save households up to GBP 100 on their annual electricity bills. With government-funded rebates and subsidies, consumers could earn back their initial investment in less than 6 years.

In the US, Arizona-based Southwest Windpower rustled up USD 8 million in venture capital for a similar approach: it’s developing a new 1.8 KW Skystream 3.7 turbine. The company claims the Skystream is a breakthrough in residential power appliances, that will change how homes and small businesses receive electricity. Any extra energy is fed into the utility grid, spinning the customer's meter backwards. Which of course turns these consumers into green minipreneurs. The market? There are a LOT of wind-swept places on this globe. Who’s next?

Full article here: springwise.com/eco_sustainability/consumer_generated_power_updat
Previously covered: springwise.com/eco_sustainability/urban_windmills
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.




Driving service for seniors | Mega-trend par excellence: AGING! Well-off baby boomers in most of Europe, North-America, and Asia-Pacific are creating ample opportunities for products and services aimed at making older consumers' lives easier (in fact, if DAILY LUBRICANTS work for anyone, it's this group).

One fun example: Canadian Driving Miss Daisy, a cab and companion service for senior citizens, that takes them shopping, to doctor's appointments, social events, etc. The company prides itself on providing extra care and security to its elderly customers, at affordable prices. Driving Miss Daisy currently has seven cars in Edmonton, Calgary, and is looking to expand to other cities. Driving services should work particularly well if marketed not only to senior customers, but also to their (busy) grown-up children, who don't always have enough time to help out their parents as much as they would like. A rewarding business idea for caring entrepreneurs!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/transportation/driving_service_for_seniors
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.


Green rentals | Oh, and perhaps Miss Daisy would like to be driven in a vehicle that kills fewer trees: a partnership with US based EV Rental Cars would be a fun one. The first US rental car company whose entire fleet consists of hybrid vehicles, the company offers its customers a clean(er) conscience, lower prices at the pump, and, in California, access to carpool lanes, even when the driver is the only occupant. Following in the footsteps of hybrid taxis, this is definitely a concept that deserves to be copied across the world.

Full article here: www.springwise.com/eco_sustainability/green_rentals
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.

 

Happy healthy meals | Part of the never-ending health trend and obesity obsession, school lunches are a hot topic across the world: from British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver's Feed Me Better campaign, to Two Angry Moms trying to improve school lunches in the US. Both are aiming to get junk food out, and bring whole foods in.

Two Dutch entrepreneurs came up with their own solution to the lunch challenge (adding in a bit of convenience as well): Lunch4Kids. Packaged like a McDonald's Happy Meal, each lunchbox contains sandwiches, a drink (milk or juice), a piece of fruit and a snack (yoghurt, a cookie, a baby cucumber, etc). Parents order online, specifying which foods their youngsters will leave untouched, and anything they're allergic to. The lunchboxes are delivered to participating schools every morning, and invoices are sent directly to parents. This keeps things simple for schools: nothing to administrate or refrigerate.

Large food brands, including Unilever and Danone, are itching to get in on the action. We can't blame them -- this business idea incorporates some of the biggest and enduring trends around, from an obsession with health and craving convenience, to the power of design and customization/personalisation. Some yummy opportunities here!

Full article here: www.springwise.com/food_beverage/happy_healthy_meals
Please share your thoughts in the comments section, or add similar concepts that exist in your own city or country.

This is just a tiny selection of innovations from around the world. How did these guys and gals do it? How did they translate their insights into the new goods, services and experiences described above? It really comes down to diving into trend findings, looking at deeper consumer needs, locating any friction, and creating solutions, with an entrepreneurial mindset.

Ready to get going yourself? Then check out the dozens of trends we've featured (www.trendwatching.com/trends), scan through the other 400 or so ideas on sister-site Springwise, and get creative!


xxx